Long Long Long

It’s been a long, long, long time since I have posted on this blog.  I cannot get this song out of my head. I walk the streets to it during the day, I dream of it at night and wake up to it in the mornings. It seems to be my constant companion, whispering in my ear, gently beguiling me to understand its very particular message for me.  It resonates in so many different aspects of my life right now and when I hear it I feel it sweep me up and take me out to sea with it, yet I cannot make a mark on what it is trying to tell me.  For now, I will use it as a vehicle to try and start posting again.  It’s been a long, long, long time.

 

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Hey Valentine!

Hey Valentine!

Hey Valentine!

This year I had no time to make a holiday card…so I decided I would send out New Year’s cards…which also never happened… so I made valentines.  Valentines are the most fun to make anyway!

Hey Valentine!

Here is a little how-to for making these origami valentines.

Step 1
Step 1

•Step 1

Cut a 6×6″ square out of paper.  Fold the square from corner to corner in one direction, and then fold it again from corner to corner in the other direction.

Step 2
Step 2

•Step 2

Turn the paper so that is is a diamond shape.  Fold the bottom corner up to the middle line.  Fold the top corner down to the edge of the paper.

Step 3
Step 3

•Step 3

Fold the right edge up and in to the middle and then fold the left edge up and in to the middle.

Step 4
Step 4

•Step 4

Flip the heart over. Fold the top corners down (I put a dab of glue here as well to keep them down, but that’s optional), and fold the side corners back (don’t glue these).

Step 5
Step 5

• Step 5

Done! Your valentine should look like this.

I finished mine off with a piece of hot pink washi tape and a message…

Hey Valentine!

Hey Valentine!

xoxo

Elizabeth

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The White House

The White House: Part 1

This weekend it was my great good fortune (and such an honor!) to have the opportunity to visit the White House.  My close friend Kate’s brother Michael, also a friend of mine, works for Obama and was able to arrange for my family and I to have a tour of both the East Wings and West Wings of this great American house. Sheepishly I admit that this was my second time visiting both wings, but it was such a thrill to get to share it with my brother, mother, and father as we are all great lovers of learning, history, art and adventure.  Photography was not allowed but I would like to share some of my favorite things with you.  I will start with this beautiful inscription on the mantel in the State Room of the East Wing:

“I pray Heaven to bestow the best of blessings on this House, and all that shall hereafter inhabit it.  May none but honest and wise men ever rule under this roof!”

Screen shot 2013-02-03 at 4.19.03 PM

 

The State Dining Room, the White House.
The State Dining Room, the White House.

Restored during the Kennedy restoration, this 1901 mantel was placed there by Franklin Roosevelt, with an inscription from a letter that John Adams wrote to his wife after he moved in as the first resident of the house following its construction in 1800.  Lincoln’s portrait sits above the mantel. The inscription is a beautiful (if optimistic) wish for the White House!

Some favorite pieces from the East Wing:

Two incredible sculptures that sit in the Center Hall of the Ground Floor Residence. One is “Coming Through the Rye” by Frederic Sackrider Remington, modeled in 1902 and cast in 1918. It must have appealed to my inner cowgirl.

“Coming Through the Rye”, by Frederic Sackrider Remington

The other is “Meat for Wild Men” by Charles Marion Russell, modeled c.1920 and cast 1956. Gruesome but lovely none-the-less!

“Meat for Wild Men” by Charles Marion Russell

Also in the Center Hall of the Ground Floor Residence is this cabinet displaying Presidential china services spanning our Nation’s history.  It was quite interesting.  I spent a while inspecting the collection and narrowing down my favorites.  The finalists were the Clinton service, the pieces showcased from Lincoln’s presidency, and the curious china pattern from the Rutherford B. Hayes administration.  The full collection is housed in the China Room which is also on the Ground Floor of the Residence and features this striking portrait of Grace Coolidge and her dog. If I were to be First Lady,  I should most definitely like to have a portrait with my dog!

A cabinet displaying Presidential china services

Rutherford B. Hayes’ Presidential service pattern. Wild!
Grace Coolidge and dog.

The East Wing also houses many of the official portraits of the Presidents and First Ladies.  Here are the ones that I was drawn to:

John F Kennedy by Aaron Shikler
George Washington by Gilbert Stuart. This portrait was saved by Dolley Madison during the White House fire in 1812.
Abraham Lincoln by George Peter Alexander Healy
Andrew Jackson by Ralph E.W. Earl
Hillary Rodham Clinton by Simmie Knox
Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis by Aaron Shikler

The only portrait that I didn’t see, was the portrait of this great American woman:

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt by Douglas Chandor

This ornate piano, by Steinway and Son, 1938, in the Entrance Hall

Piano, Steinway and Sons, 1938

I will leave it at that for the East Wing, although there are so many rooms and things to talk about. I will fill you in on my trip to the West Wing in my next post, so stay tuned!

For more information and a detailed tour of the East Wing, check out this historic and fascinating video:

Jacqueline Kennedy’s 1962 Tour of the White House:Screen shot 2013-02-03 at 10.46.06 PM

Jacqueline Kennedy was responsible for the restoration of the White House during the Kennedy administration.  She said  ”Everything in the White House must have a reason for being there. It would be sacrilege merely to redecorate it—a word I hate. It must be restored, and that has nothing to do with decoration. That is a question of scholarship.”  She believed that the White House should be a place of pilgrimage for Americans, where one would be able to sense and touch the people who had been there.  The quality and historical significance of the many of the artworks and objects in the White House today are in large part due to the efforts of Jacqueline Kennedy.

I would like to note that the White House remains the largest and most prominent public building housing a head of state still open to the public in the world.   Although security has tightened greatly in the last 15 years, the rooms in the East Wing remain “by the people and for the people.”  Visits can be arranged through one’s local Congressman.

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So Rosy Eyed

When I was studying photography, my interest was in creating photographs that were painterly. Painting has a language all its own which is not easily referenced strictly through the unflinchingly straightforward lense of a camera.  So clearly I’m obsessed, in love and green with envy over this guy’s work:

Rosy Eyed

Rosy Eyed Rosy Eyed Rosy Eyed Rosy Eyed Rosy Eyed Rosy Eyed

Rosy Eyed

Photographer Nick Knight developed this body of work over a 10 year period by taking large scale photographs, inspired by 16th century still life paintings, and exposing the prints to heat and water during the printing process.  The results leave me both in love and in envy.

 

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Cold Weather Inspiration

I am spending this quiet week between Christmas and the New Year in Connecticut, relaxing after a hectic summer and fall, topped off by a very busy 3 weeks in Chicago.  We are supposed to have another snow storm tonight so I’m happy to get cozy and zen out by the fire with books and movies.  Here are some beautiful quilts I’ve found in a book about the quilts of Gee’s Bend which have been made over four generations of women in Alabama.  They are so curious, bold, and freewheeling while at the same time being minimal, graphic and modern. Abstract really. I love them!

Here is a segment from NPR’s  ”Talk of the Nation” back in 2003 on Gee’s Bend. If you care to listen, enjoy!

 

 

 

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8 Crazy Nights

8 Crazy Nights

Please check out this story I styled on DIY Menorahs for Martha Stewart Living, December 2012.  The amazing Jodi Levine of Martha Stewart Crafts Department developed the Menorah ideas and did all of the crafting.  I styled the shoot (and ate one of those delish Creme Brulee donuts in the opener from Doughnut Plant!).  Linda Pugliese was the photographer. Happy Hanukkah!

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